Universities are offering degrees in gaming science

As more universities offer degrees in gaming sciences, students like those competing at a college computer game showcase in Southern California see a future and a career in video game design.

TRANSCRIPT

As more universities offer degrees in gaming sciences, students like those competing at a college computer-game showcase in Southern California see a future and a career in video-game design.

Here's a look.

The next generation of video-game developers are taking center stage.

This team from UC Irvine was the judges' choice at the annual Intercollegiate Computer Game Showcase.

The event drew in game-development teams from campuses across Southern California.

The winning team created the game 'Guesstimate,' which is pretty much what it sounds like -- a guessing game that uses shapes and colors.

Most of these teams plan to turn their degrees and creations into a career.

I'm actually a computer-game-science major at UCI.

And I'm hoping to, you know, get into a company.

Blizzard is nearby.

I would love to work for them, especially out of college, but, you know, also interested in developing my own games soon as I graduate from college.

The gaming industry has grown into a mutlibillion-dollar universe, with college programs offering degrees in the craft.

What was thought of as goofing off at one time, today is a true career path.

Adam should know.

He was one of those early goof-offs from the 1980s.

He brought games like 'Gato' and 'Tetris' to the marketplace.

He served as a judge this year and says creating games in college can propel your career path into hyperdrive.

And that's what the Activisions and the Blizzards and all those people look at is, you know, they want experience.

And now you can get some experience at a college level.

It doesn't have to be at a job.

In gaming terms, judges say the industry's still an 'open world.'

New developers have multiple avenues to route their games into the hands of players.

The gaming market in the last few years, it's kind of changed a little bit.

I think there's a lot more opportunities for smaller teams to make games and actually distribute them, especially with early access on Steam.

Kickstarter is a great way to get funding for your games.

Another design team, that created the game 'Titan Mining,' may be headed in that direction after college.

I have considered going into the game industry.

As far as what level I'll be going into, I'm not entirely sure yet.

I've been discussing with some of my friends about starting up some kind of an indie company or doing a Kickstarter or something like that.

There may be millions of dollars to be made on the next big thing, [Chuckles] but in true gamer fashion, some of these designers have a 'take it or leave it' attitude when it comes to jumping into the business.

My major right now isn't specifically game science.

It's computer science and material sciences.

But I wouldn't hate it, and, in fact, I would like it a lot.

So we'll see.