Space films

The Houston Cinema Arts Festival holds a competition called CineSpace, in which filmmakers from across the country create original short films using footage from NASA. Last year, one of the top mentions was directed by a creative mind from space city itself.

TRANSCRIPT

The Houston Cinema Arts Festival holds a competition called CineSpace, in which filmmakers from across the country create original short films using footage from NASA.

Last year, one of the top entries was directed by a creative mind from Space City itself.

Take a look.

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There is no real-life sci-fi better than NASA.

As a kid, I loved science-fiction movies, stories, exploration.

Anything to do with robots and different planets and different worlds, I was fascinated with.

[ Static ] To be an adult and be able to kind of still dabble in that genre, and to develop these kind of 'What if?' concept stories is a lot of fun.

HAM-1, You have exactly 10 minutes to final marker.

I got into filmmaking about 10 years ago.

Digital filmmaking really was a huge game changer.

Going from film to digital made what I thought years ago was gonna be kind of impossible to do much more affordable.

So, when the CineSpace film festival came up, I thought, 'Oh, this is a great opportunity to try and do something NASA-related.'

That's the whole cool thing about this, was being able to incorporate this great history of NASA and all this archival imagery they have, whether it's photography or video, into a project and develop a story.

It's like being a kid.

You know, you get to play like you're in space.

You know, if we can't go up there, at least it's the next best thing.

It's a 12-minute film.

The process for the entire project was five months.

And so what we did is, we start initially with research and developing a story line.

Today would have been my mother's 50th birthday.

So, I wanted to create a film that had an international flair to it, an international feel.

Uju Edoziem, the actress that plays Anuli in our film, and she is from Nigeria.

So I immediately got that connection going.

And then we knew that we wanted to do something based on water.

Water is life, and it was a really nice continuing theme throughout.

Even out here, so far from Earth, I still carry a piece of home with me.

But the post-production was what took a long time.

It was about three months of just post-production work.

Everything that's happened in my life has led to this moment.

'Cause we're taking this NASA imagery and integrating it into the story.

And one of the things we had a challenge was finding 4K-resolution footage to use.

And we couldn't find a lot of that, so we used a lot of photography.

There are about 50 shots in the film that are visual-effects shots based on some type of NASA imagery.

About 30 of those shots are based on photography, and 20 are based on video footage.

We took Space Station imagery and then just built our own International Space Station Mars off of that, 'cause we figured it would not be the same space station, necessarily.

The non-linear editing software is just tremendous for doing these films.

It's a great way to create big-scale-looking films for very little money.

I didn't think there would be a whole lot of music in this initially, but for this it was that element that really tied it together.

6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0.

There is that sense of wonder and excitement that comes with space exploration.

The discovery of water on Mars, that was in our film before that was ever announced.

Which is kind of neat.

And the exploration of Mars by mankind has just been announced this September.

So much research, so much stuff that went into the story, it enlightened me more, and got me more excited about NASA again.