Girls That Code

An organization in Austin, Texas, is providing a space for girls to learn how to code, “code girls” is teaching skills needed for a future in tech. This segment is part of American graduate: getting to work, a public media initiative made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting.

TRANSCRIPT

An organization in Austin, Texas, is providing a space for girls to learn how to code.

Code Girls is teaching skills needed for a future in tech.

This segment is part of American Graduate: Getting to Work, a public media initiative made possible by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

For many jobs in the tech industry, especially coding, the majority of the employees are men.

In 1994, 37 percent of computer science majors in the US were women.

Today, that figure is just 18 percent.

One club in Austin, Texas, is looking to raise those numbers.

Code Girls, a similar organization to Girls Who Code, is providing a space for young girls to learn how to code in an environment they won't feel alienated or unaccepted.

Code Girls' president, Varshinee Sreekanth, describes her experience.

I have been in Code Girls for the last 4 years, since my freshman year, because that is when the club was formed.

I joined because I had just taken AP computer science, and I wanted, you know, new experiences in computer science, and then I walked into the computer science club, and it's all guys, and that was really my first exposure to the issue of the lack of girls and women in computer science and engineering in general.

It's a big issue.

It's everywhere at this point, but there's still a disproportionate amount, so Code Girls, Girls Who Code at the time, was created to combat that issue, and I really liked the message of it.

I thought it was a great idea, and I joined, and I stayed through these last 4 years because I still believe in the message.

I did not have anything similar to Girls Who Code or Code Girls when I was growing up.

My first experience with coding was in college.

I took a C++ coding course, and I was one of the only women in the class, but it was a great opportunity for me to learn about coding firsthand and to actually learn how to create something.

I hope to see the gap demolished, you know?

I hope that we don't have to have this conversation about women in coding, and it's just people in coding, and that we're just doing the work and accomplishing great things.

We're trying to give them these basic skills, specifically as well as some other skills like communication, creating a community, especially this community of girls, as well as PhotoShop skills, design skills that will all be an asset to them in the workforce.

Remember the numbers, it goes to 9, A, B, C, D, E, F, which F is 15.

It's just so essential these days.

No matter where you go, knowing how to code is a huge asset, so we're focusing on, you know, fostering these girls and teaching them the skills that they can use to succeed in college and beyond.