Exploring the virtual world

VR World NYC is the largest VR entertainment center in the Western Hemisphere. In this segment, we take a step inside VR World and see how visitors are exploring an entirely different reality.

TRANSCRIPT

VR World NYC is the largest VR entertainment center in the Western Hemisphere.

In this segment, we take a step inside VR world and see how visitors are exploring an entirely different reality.

Our partner 'Science Friday' has the story.

Where the technology is at right now, it's amazing.

Even the most basic gaming experience really can make you examine the consensus reality, and -- and that, to me, has the ability to really transform how we interact with, not only entertainment, but technology.

♪♪ My name is Tommy Goodkin.

And I'm the head of content at VR World NYC.

My job is to curate the best VR experiences, and that definitely involves a lot of VR gaming.

VR World is the largest VR entertainment center in the Western Hemisphere.

At its very core, we're offering people experiences that you would expect from a theme park rather than something like an arcade, whether it's like riding a roller coaster, or something that really, you know, raises your adrenalin.

A lot of people judge the entire VR industry based off of one bad experience they had in the very beginning, whether it was they got nauseous or the game play was just really basic.

But in the last three years, this technology has made jumps and strides, in terms of mitigating nausea, in terms of resolution, and conveying a really high quality experience.

People are still getting familiar with this technology, and people are often skeptical, but we really have to kind of gently ease people into using it.

Okay, you lean too forward.

Stand straight.

Because there's not really a mountain right in front of you.

Okay.

So, don't lean forward.

VR World, it stands in contradiction to the isolating elements of VR.

There's the social component, there's the competitive component.

Our space is really designed to facilitate socialization.

We like to use the like pool hall metaphor here, where, you know, you could get a pool table at home, but that wouldn't really prohibit you from going out to a bar and playing pool with your friends.

We really get a mixed bag of all different types of customers, so it's important to have something that can appeal to each different person that comes into the space, but we also have a strong emphasis on things that are a little bit off the beaten path.

The ICAROS Flight Simulator, it's a six-degree-of-freedom flight simulator.

So, you get on, you strap yourself in, and you're maneuvering it around, so it's really a strenuous workout.

Ooh, this is pretty.

And also terrifying!

Uh, Richie's Plank Experience is you going up 50 flights, and you get to the final floor, and you walk out the window on a very thin piece of wood.

And the physics are quite convincing there.

It's like the real deal.

People are constantly taken out of, you know, what they thought was possible for them to do.

We had this, uh, older lady in a wheelchair, and watching her like, reach up above her head, and pull herself through this mountain, giddy, laughing, it's one of the most beautiful experiences I think someone can have in VR.

People come in and play a lot of games and leave total VR crusaders.

I think this will absolutely, um, become a common fixture in major downtown centers, just based off the success that the early arcades have seen.

Technology and VR is going to change experiential location-based entertainment.

♪♪