Research

Saving Scallops

Due to warming waters, Scallops have struggled to exist in North Carolina’s bays and estuaries. However, thanks to a new research study at the University of North Carolina, Scallops may have a new lease on life.

Alzheimer’s May Be More Complicated

According to a 2018 annual report released by the Alzheimer’s Association, there are currently 5.7 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease. As this number is projected to increase in the next decades, researchers from the University of Texas at San Antonio have come up with a unique approach to studying the disease in hopes of […]

SciTech Now 503

In this episode of SciTech Now, a unique approach to studying Alzheimer’s disease; an app that empowers people with disabilities; how to prolong your phone’s battery; and a laser label maker.

Larva Farms

With the ability to eat twice their body mass a day, Larva may be the solution to our planet’s waste. Professor David Hu is conducting research to see how the appetites of these tiny creatures can combat human waste issues.

Invasive Algae Blooms

In the middle of the Arabian Sea Algae Blooms are taking over the base of the food chain which could prove catastrophic for 120 million people living on the sea’s edge. Joaquim Goes, Research Professor at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York City joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss this growing problem.

Predicting the Clouds

New research at the University of Texas at San Antonio is helping to predict clouds and weather patterns that affect solar grids.

Technology to warn wrong way drivers

Wrong way driving crashes account for over 300 traffic deaths in the United States each year. The Texas Department Of Transportation has teamed up with other research institutions to find ways to better warn wrong-way drivers. They hope these technological advancements will be in our vehicles in the next few years.

SciTech Now Episode 243

In this episode of SciTech Now, accessing oceans for scientific research; what happens when two black holes collide?; giving medical students a new way to study anatomy; and a look inside Howe Caverns, which may provide insight into how the world began.

Can we crowdsource scientific research?

Science may seem like a members-only club for experts and academics, but recent efforts are opening the field to anyone who’s interested. Darlene Cavalier, founder of the science research crowdsourcing site, joins us to discuss.